Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing - Oceana Europe

Businesses Against Illegal Fishing

Weaving alliances with companies that provide services to the marine sector is key to making them part of the solution in the fight against illegal fishing.

SHARE TO SHOW YOUR SUPPORT:

Increasing International Fisheries Transparency

Illegal fishing takes place everywhere, within national waters and on the high seas, flourishing where transparency and governance are weak.

SHARE TO SHOW YOUR SUPPORT:

Fighting Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated Fishing in

One in five fish taken from the ocean comes from illegal fishing. Having more public information on who can fish what, when, and where would help ensure better fisheries management and protection of the ocean.

SHARE TO SHOW YOUR SUPPORT:

Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing

Illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing is a problem that affects the ocean worldwide and costs the global economy tens of billions of euros every year. It destroys marine habitats, adds pressure to fish populations that are already at risk of over-exploitation and undermines efforts to responsibly manage and protect the ocean.

Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing exploits the natural resources of coastal nations, reduces economic opportunities, and threatens food security—particularly in developing countries.

Those that participate in illegal fishing break or avoid the law by operating without a license, fishing where it is forbidden, using illegal gear, catching endangered species, or taking more than what is allowed.

Illegal fishers avoid national and international rules and operate outside the reach of government control. They not only hide their vessels at sea, but also use shell companies and tax havens to mask their identity and hide money flows. They often carry out their activities in an organised, systematic way globally, involving structured criminal networks. For these fishers, it is currently a low-risk activity that delivers big profits.  

In the battle to eliminate IUU fishing over the past 20 years, Oceana has both identified illegal operators and persuaded governments to strengthen regulation. Using state-of-the-art tools like Global Fishing Watch, we closely monitor and expose illegal fishing activities to national and international authorities, as well as promote the need for more transparency in the sector to stop illegal activities at EU and national level. We also work with the private sector to make it more difficult for illegal fishers to obtain the essential services they need to operate.

Accomplishments

February, 2019

Spanish government creates the second-largest marine national park in the Mediterranean

After more than a decade of campaign work by Oceana and six research expeditions made possible by numerous supporters, the Spanish government increased the size of Cabrera National Park from 100 to 900 square kilometers. This increase makes Cabrera  – one of the richest and most biodiverse places in the Mediterranean and Spanish Coast –  the second largest marine national park in the Mediterranean and the first one to formerly protect deep-sea corals. The park will also provide shelter to important species including marine mammals like sperm whales and dolphins and large fish like bluefin tuna, and will be the Mediterranean’s deepest protected national park at over 2,000 meters.

June, 2018

Malta Expands Habitat Protections in Mediterranean

The government of Malta has announced the designation or expansion of eight marine protected areas in the Mediterranean. This announcement is the result of Oceana efforts that began in 2013, and the protections are based on the findings of two Oceana expeditions (2015 and 2016 LIFE Ba?AR Expeditions). Oceana mapped out sandbanks, reefs and more than 89 marine caves through use of a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) and scuba divers. After collecting and analyzing 310 hours of ROV footage and thousands of photos, we delivered a list of proposed sites for protection to the Maltese government that included seagrass meadows, bamboo coral gardens and habitat for cnidarians, sponges, a variety of other invertebrates and fish. With these new measures, 35 percent of Malta’s waters are now protected. As a designation made under the Natura 2000 framework, national authorities are now responsible for drafting a management plan within six years – a key step toward ensuring the continued protection of these areas.

Reports & Factsheets

Around the Web

Learn More

VIDEO: SMALL-SCALE FISHING VESSELS - GALICIA

VIDEO: SMALL SCALE FISHERIES CATCH REPORTING – A SUCCESS STORY FROM CROATIA

OUR COLLABORATIONS