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Blog Posts by: Karina Erazo

Day one of our mission for the search of plastics started off at 08:00 hours with a hearty breakfast. We explored areas relatively close to Pobla Marina to test out our equipment, beginning with a deep-sea meadow. We dived in one end of the meadow, while the ROV explored the other. And, although we located some plastics, we decided that the search must continue. So, we went to an area with a sandy bottom, again, no luck: the water got rough, so we had to get back on board.

After picking up our equipment and the trip to Puebla Marina, the Ranger´s home port, we finally met the rest of the crew. We all then had an introductory meeting where we planned for the days ahead and then set off to get everything ready for tomorrow. We´re all excited and looking forward to this five-day survey!

Below the water’s surface, are 17 000 species that can potentially help us in the fight against climate change that are, oddly enough, being overlooked: these are of course, the algae. Just like any other plant, algae use CO2 for photosynthesis, and thus, absorb a great amount of this greenhouse gas. And that is what brings us to the Climate Change Conference, to show just how important a role algae play and why they need to be protected.

‘Beauty is in the eye of the beholder,’ an old adage says. This phrase is even more relevant when talking about hidden gems lying in sea-bottom areas of the North Sea, which many consider to be a cold and dark sea, composed of murky waters and dull animals living in it.

Time to summarize and to start thinking about the report we must prepare about all the findings we’ve made during the expedition.

Today, we had an event in Vaasa with journalists, scientists and representatives from governmental agencies and fisher’s associations. It was good to have the chance to exchange information and feelings with people that are also interested about this part of the Baltic Sea.

Now, we start the process of putting all the information we’ve gathered into motion so that we may promote a transboundary marine protected area in this unique ecosystem.

Due to the inclement weather, we’ll have to stay in port for the next few days and today will be our last day at sea.

Luckily, after anchoring overnight, we were able to sail towards our work site for the day and were able to complete a dive, a grab, CTD and use the drop camera.

Afterwards, the whole crew took stock of the equipment and started packing. Tomorrow a truck will pick up everything and take it back to our warehouse in Spain.

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